An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 8

An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1747 edition. Excerpt: ...a native of Baby-and, as to the name of Lerian, son, and, in favour of this opi-it might have been given himbenion, quote Eujiathius; but there cause he lived some time in the is evidently a mistake in the pas-island of Leros. Strabo no-where sage which they allege, since Eu-mentions Pherecydes of Ltros, but /athius, in the very fame place often speaks of the other two, jealls him a native of Syros. Some calling the one a philosopher, and therefore, in the text of that the other an historian. Cicero writer, instead of Bivf orto; (42), the scholiast of Euripides read B/J/of, as it is in Suidas (43), Macrobius (44), and Ori#nd the chronology of the Olym-gen (45), quote Pherecydes, with (41) Cic. Tufc. purst. I. i. e. t58. (41) C(c. dt orat. I. a. (43) Seio Hast. Erip, d. in Akcst, (44) Macrob. Suturnai. 1. T.c. at. Onsen, m Ctlj. I. i, ' OtU son of AEnius, and grandson of Cary/ius and RJyase j but who these were, neither Strabo, nor Stephanusbk transcriber, have thought fit to acquaint us. This island was long uninhabited by reason of the frequent ami dreadful earthquakes to which it was subject; but they no sooner ceased, than the inhabitants of the adjoining islands settled in it, and built a town to which they gave the name of the island The poets feigned, that the centaurs killed by Hercules were buried here, whence took rife the proverb, To place all things under one Mycone, applied to those, who, under one and the same title, touched upon quite different subjects Strabo, and after him Eujtathiush, observe, that the Myconians grew bald very early; whence they were called by way of contempt, The bald heads of Mycone. Our modern travellers confirm Strabo' observation assuring us, that the present Myconians lose jbheir hair whenshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 290 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 522g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236755065
  • 9781236755063