An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 7

An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 7

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1747 edition. Excerpt: ...of their respective countries, and oppress, by all possible methods, those who were sincere friends to the liberty which they had received from their ancestors. This single maxim is sufficient to give us a true idea of the pretended equity and moderation which the Romans discovered on some occasions. From this period, Rome began to treat the Achaeans in a TAcha: . quite different manner from what she had done in former ans comtimes. Peremptory orders were sent them to restore the La-manded to cedamonian exiles, and pay a blind obedience to the decrees restore the of the senate. Letters were at the fame time directed to the LacedaeAEtolians, B otians, Acarnanians, and other free states 0fmo"ian Greece, unjoining them to fee the orders of the senate put in'""' execution, and exhorting them to employ, in their respective. t Pol'vb. in legat. c. 38, U 4 common commonwealths, men only of such noble sentiments as Callicrates. Thus the Romans requited the eminent services which the Aarons had done them in their wars with Philip and Antiochus, and the inviolable fidelity, with which they adhered to them, when they were despised by the other cities of Greece (Z). Callicrates, on his return to Peloponnesus, spread so artfully the terror of the Roman name, and intimidated the people to such a degree, that he was elected praetor; in which employment he restored the Lacedaemonian and Mejftnian exiles and omitted nothing that could any ways oblige his patrons the Romans. series By these violent methods Rome got numbers of flatterers, king of but lost many of her best friends; and, on the other side, Macedon Perfes, who had succeeded Philip in the kingdom of Macedon, tndea-vours spared no pains to win over to hshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 264 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 476g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236834879
  • 9781236834874