An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 4

An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1747 edition. Excerpt: ...it signifies to think it the fame with his the country of Assyria; for Adiaba, which he would have both ways it is often assumed in to be denominated from its Scripture. Those who are swiftness, for the last interpretation, are (K.) The text (37), which judged to force tie text, being f-,4) Uhifip. Hist, natur. I. vj. t. 16. (j6) Ce fr.tpk. amis. vol. v. I. iii. c. 17. (37) Genes, x. ti. (38) Vid. t'niKjr. trigs. Baby.m.: 4. f. 33). bligedv beginning a kingdom distinct from Babylon, though in process of time they coalesced into one, in consequence of obliged to supply a defect in the Hebrew, by inserting a particle into to serve their purpose; while those who vindicate the other, follow the natural order and construction of the words of the original, as they stand. But, not to dwell on these grammatical niceties, we choole to recur to such arguments as may be reasonably qffered to set this matter in a clear light. It is on all hand allowed, that the land of Ashur, or Assyria, derived its name from Ashur the son of Sbem; and, according to what we read in Scripture (39, it must have been he that went out of the land of Shinar, where all the descendants of Naab were at the time of the dispersion, in order to plant or take possession of the country since called by his name; and can any thing be more natural, than to suppose, that the text before us is meant of this migration of his? And who so likely to have founded Nineveh, and the other cities, as himself? except we can imagine it likely, that Nimrod made a conquest of this country before Ashur had well fettled himself in it. If this had been the case, the country, it is likely, would have been known by his name, rather than by that of his great uncle. We elsewhere (40) read, indeed, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123688017X
  • 9781236880178