An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 15

An Universal History from the Earliest Account of Time; Compiled from Original Authors and Illustrated with Maps, Cuts, Notes Etc. with a General Index to the Whole Volume 15

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1748 edition. Excerpt: ...glad of any pretence to raise it 1. Severus entered Rome, attended by all his troops under His entry arms, and with the standards of the praetorian guards reversed. irtoRome. He came to the gate on horseback, and in his military habit; but there took his gown, and made his entry on foot, accompanied by the senators in their robes, with crowns of laurel on their heads; which the people likewise wore, who, on this occasion, were all clad in white. The streets through which he palled were strewed with fljwers, the houses adorned, and covered with rich tapestry, and the whole city perfumed with sweet odours. Severus, having visited the capitol, and the usual temples, retired to the palace; but the soldiers, taking up their quarters in the temples, porticoes, and other public buildings, spreid themselves all over the city, and committed every-wherc great disorders, threatening to plunder the citizens houses, if they were not plentifully supplied with provisions, for which they would allow nothing. This alarmed the people, and inspired them with a great aversion from the new emperorc. The next morning Severus went to the senate, attended by all his troops under arms; but he had scarce begun Tiesoldito speak, when he was interropted on a sudden by dreadful ersmutiny. cries of the soldiers without, demanding an immense sum of the senate, which had been formerly given to the troops that b Herodian, p. 510. Dio, p. 839. c Herodian. p. 839. (W) Di Caffius tells us, that by any means, leave him, killed one of their horses followed his him, and, running himself thro' old mailer, throwing down, and with the same sword, fell dead rreading under foot, all those by him. The sine hillorian who endeavoured to stop him; adds, that the faithful horse be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 258 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 467g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236786661
  • 9781236786661