The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture; Comprehending Lists of the Inhabitants of London, Westminster, and Borough of Southwark and All the Cities, Towns, and Principal Villages, in England and Wales Volume 2

The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture; Comprehending Lists of the Inhabitants of London, Westminster, and Borough of Southwark and All the Cities, Towns, and Principal Villages, in England and Wales Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ...The presen Yot, . II. No. 24. 3 P commiifcr commissary is John Fisher, LL. D. They have also an high-steward, chosen by the senate, and holding by patent from the University. The present highsteward is Mr. Pitt. The chancellor's courts, here and at Oxford, enjoy the sole jurisdiction, in exclusion of the king's courts, overall civil actfons and suits what so ver, wheie a scholar or privileged person is one of the parties, except where the right of frecliold is concerned. Privileges of this kind are of very high antiquity, being enjoyed by all foreign universities as well as our own, in consequence (as Judge Blackstone apprehends) of a constitution of the Emperor Frederic, A. D. The vice-chancellor is annually chosen on the 4th of November, by the body of the University, out of two persons nominated by the heads of the colleges. Two proctors are also annually chosen; as also are two taxers, who, with the proctors, have cognizance of weights and measures, as clerks of the market. The University has a Cullos Archivorum, or register; three esquire beadles, one yeoman-beadle, and two library-keepers. The proctors visit the taverns, and other public-houses, and have power to punisli offending scholars, and t- fine the public-houses who entertain them. As to the antiquity of the University of Cambridge, the story goes, that Cantaber, a Spaniard, 270 years before Christ, first founded it; and that Sebert, king of the East Angles, restored it, Anno Christi 630. Afterwards, as the latirned Camden observes, it lay a long time neglected, and was overthrown by the Danish storms, till all things revived under the Norman government. Soon after, inns, hotels, and halls, were built for students, though without endowments. The colleges were founded in the following...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 614 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 31mm | 1,080g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236515749
  • 9781236515742