Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Bulletin Volume 2

Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Bulletin Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...any collection of pus in the pelvis. Galvano-puncture is recommended for this condition only in those cases in which the collection is situated in close proximity to the posterior fornix, a deeper situation-demanding surgical treatment. Of puncture in the treatment of fibroids he retains a good opinion, but restricts the depth and direction of puncture within very narrow limits. Following this interesting introduction appear chapters of the book proper on electric laws, definitions and unities, and the various currents and batteries. This part of the book is singularly disappointing. Instead of clear and definite statements of current laws and electric units we are given a most remarkable pot-pourri of disjointed and irrelevant facts, interspersed with profound calculations and antiquated illustrations. The best illustration is that which this portion of the book itself affords of the undesirability of compilations in this day of devotion to specialties. Our literary appetites and digestions are jaded by a superabundance. Unless the food offered is well cooked it is in our way. This fault of the work is the more to be regretted as many awkward and ignorant users of strong currents will turn to it for aid. In this connection protest should be made against the frequent use by the author of the word "tension," apparently after the French electro-therapeutic writers of the old school. This word has long since been abandoned by the great body of electricians, who use the word "pressure" instead, as expressing a more distinct idea of the meaning to be conveyed. "Tension" is the more objectionable when associated with the term "intensity" with which it may be oonfused. The latter word is also largely obsolete at...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 174 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 322g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123664591X
  • 9781236645913