Unemployment and Government

Unemployment and Government : Genealogies of the Social

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Description

While joblessness is by no means a phenomenon specific to this century, the concept of 'unemployment' is. This book follows the invention and transformation of unemployment, understood as a historically specific site of regulation. Taking key aspects of the history of unemployment in Britain as its focus, it argues that the ways in which authorities have defined and sought to manage the jobless have been remarkably varied. In tracing some of the different constructions of unemployment over the last 100 years - as a problem of 'character', as a social 'risk', or today, as a problem of 'skills' - the study highlights the discursive dimension of social and economic policy problems. The book examines such institutionalized practices as the labour bureau, unemployment insurance, and the 'New Deal' as 'technologies' of power. The result is a challenge to our thinking about welfare states.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 1139241338
  • 9781139241335

Table of contents

1. The discovery of unemployment; 2. Inventing unemployment: the birth of the labour exchange; 3. Governing unemployment as a 'risk'; 4. Governing through the long-term unemployed: unemployment between the wars; 5. Unemployment and its spaces; 6. Governing divided societies: the new deal.show more

Review quote

"Walters has written a sophisticated account not only of the history of unemployment but of the way social problems are defined and handled through pratices of governmentality. His book should be widely consulted." Jrnl of Sociology & Social Welfare "The book is well worth reading...it might, hopefully, stimulate serious thinking about unemployment policy in a Canadian context." Canadian Journal of Sociology Online Jan-Feb 2002show more