Two Treatises of Proclus, the Plantonic Successor; The Former Consisting of Ten Doubts Concerning Providence and a Solution of Those Doubts; And the Latter Containing a Development of the Nature of Evil

Two Treatises of Proclus, the Plantonic Successor; The Former Consisting of Ten Doubts Concerning Providence and a Solution of Those Doubts; And the Latter Containing a Development of the Nature of Evil

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ...and in no respect whatever participates of existence, is in no respect whatever being; but, nevertheless, that nonbeing is after a certain manner to be connumerated with beings. Thus also with respect to evil, because it has a twofold subsistence, one kind being evil alone, but another not unmingled" with good; the former has no existence whatever, in consequence of falling below being, just as I//1: good is beyond being; but the latter must be ranked among beings. Hence it is not deserted by being, on ' The non-being of which Proclus is here speaking, is denomi. natod by the Elcatic guesl, in the Sophista of Plato, d_i'crcents--nee, and is one of the five genera of being in intelligibles. But these five genera are, r '.m: ncc, snmenru, djference, moliun, and permanencySec my translation of the Sophistn. account of the intervention of good, nor by good, since it is still capable of remaining, on account of being: for it is at one and the same time being and 'good. And that which is in every respect evil, since it is a perfect fnling;olf from the first good, is deservedly likewisedeprived of being. For what can have a progression into beings tlzat is unable to participate of good?_ Bu! that to/u'c/z-is not 1'nc-umy 1'('-2c(: l evil, is sub-c_0nlra1;y imlccll lo a arrIain-goo: /, but not lo all gnad. lt is, however, arranged and benefited through the transcendency of the source of all good. And it, is evil lo llzosc t/rings t0 tohic/1 it is contrary, but it is neverIlzclcss suspcrulccl as goodji-om total good. For-it is not lawful to act in opposition to this; but it is requisite-that all things should be disposed according to justice, or that they should have no existence whatever. Plato, therefb'e, rightly says in thshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236772075
  • 9781236772077