Two of the Most Remarkable and Interesting of the Sonnets of Francis Bacon, the True Shakespeare; A Compilation, Arrangement, and Composition

Two of the Most Remarkable and Interesting of the Sonnets of Francis Bacon, the True Shakespeare; A Compilation, Arrangement, and Composition

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ... and the Master of the Rolls elect; that I was voiced with great expectation, and, though I say it myself, with the wishes of most men, to the higher place that of AttorneyGeneral; that I'am a man that the Queen hath already done for, and that princes, especially her Majesty, love to make an end where they begin;1 and then add hereunto the obscureness and many exceptions to my competitors: when, I say, I revolve all this, I cannot but conclude with myself that no man ever read a more exquisite disgrace."2 From a letter to the Lord Keeper, of the date July 28, 1595, (printed under line 8, below, ) I take the following paragraph: " On the other side, if I perceive any insufficient, obscure, idol man offered to her Majesty, then I think myself double bound to use the best means I can for myself," &c. And from a letter to the Queen this excerpt: Madam: --Remembering that your Majesty had been gracious to me both in countenancing me and conferring upon me the reversion of a good place, and perceiving that your Majesty had taken some displeasure towards me, both these were arguments to move me to offer unto your Majesty my service, to the end to have means to deserve your favor and to repair my error. 1 Note how contradictory this opinion of the Queen's constancy is of the opinion expressed in the letter "framed as from Mr. Anthony Bacon to the Earl of Essex" (given above, under Sonnet xxvi, in the notes on the Dedication of Lucrece): " She hath that character of the divine nature and goodness as quos amnvit, amavit usque ad fi.ii.em those whom she has loved she has loved even to the end." 3 Wolsey, in Henry VIII., m, 2, exclaims: U, how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favors! There is betwixt that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236496353
  • 9781236496355