Twenty Years on the Trap Line; Being a Collection of Revised Camp Notes Written at Intervals During a Twenty Years Experience in Trapping, Wolfing and Hunting, on the Great Northwestern Plains

Twenty Years on the Trap Line; Being a Collection of Revised Camp Notes Written at Intervals During a Twenty Years Experience in Trapping, Wolfing and Hunting, on the Great Northwestern Plains

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ... aloaj tho33 rivers above named. His dealings with the Indians was much in the nature of a commission merchant beween them and the regular fur companies with a very narrow margin in his own profits. From the early spring until late in the fall, he could be found in one of these rivers, either in solitary camp or with an Indian family, trappirg some choice fur bearers resort, or gliding along in a canoe as described in.the opening of this chapter. In his earlier years he made his principal stay among the Sioux of the "Dirt Lodges" on Firestael Creek that puts into the Dakota River sixty miles from its junction with the Missouri. Immediately following the Santee Sioux outbrjik in Minnesota, in 18&2, several murdcre were d mmittr-d in the southern part of Dakota T rritorr, by hostile Indians. In 1P63. tie Waterman family, living on the yebraska side of the Missouri nearly opposite the mouth if the Dakota River, were found to have been murdered. About the same time two men were found dead in their Mankets at Greenway's Ferry, on the Dakota, some four miles from Yankton, the new teir' oria' capital. And a few months later, the Sioux City and Fort Randall stage was attacked by Indians at Choteau Creek. All of these depredations happening in the neighbo.hood of Yankton, the people were easily influenced to become suspicious'of the friendly Yankton Sioux, and wild rumors of "Old Dakota" being a spy were freely circulated, breeding an ill feeling against him. But justice to the old Frenchman's memoiy, anr' of the red Yanktons, compels me to say that these outrxges were committed by d: stnt hands of roring hostiles. with the possible exception of the attack on the stsrje. And further to the old man's credit, may it be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236863208
  • 9781236863201