The Truth about the Navy; With an Account of the Development of the German Fleet and Details of the World's War-Fleets--Built and Building--With Statistical Comparisons

The Truth about the Navy; With an Account of the Development of the German Fleet and Details of the World's War-Fleets--Built and Building--With Statistical Comparisons

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...been decided that the Act of 1900 would have to be amended because Germany could no longer count on the compensations of superior training. In these circumstances the amendment to the Act of 1900 was framed, and since the Reichstag had put its hand to the plough, it could not well refuse to start on a new furrow when the old one proved unprofitable. Thus it comes about that Ger many is about to build in regular succession no fewer than eighteen Dreadnoughtal (1) Two of these ships should have been commenced in the spring, but the keel-plates of neither have yet been laid (November, 1906), Unfortunately for the German taxpayer, this latest change in naval policy is far-reaching in its effects, and he has not nearly paid the price when he puts down the money for the construction of the ships and for the increased number of officers and men required for the bigger ships. Men-of-war must have harbours in which they can ride in safety, docks in which they can lie for repairs, and lastly, German men-of-war must be able to pass quickly from the Baltic to the North Sea by way of the Kiel Canal, or the strategic idea on which the German Fleet is being based disappears. From first to last the Kiel Canal has been a source of great disappointment. It was to prove a short cut from the North Sea to the Baltic, and ships were to pass from end to end in a matter of about eight hours. The canal was hailed as the realisation of an old dream of the German people, a dream which they nursed long before the present Emperor converted them to the Weltpolitik. It was designed to accommodate with ease the largest merchant ships likely to use it and the biggest German men-ofwar. Time has shown that in circumscribing their scheme and reducing expenditure the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236750470
  • 9781236750471