Trees of the Northern United States; Their Study, Description and Determination, for the Use of Schools and Private Students

Trees of the Northern United States; Their Study, Description and Determination, for the Use of Schools and Private Students

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...to the variety. A pyramidal-shaped tree, 30 to 70 ft. high, with smooth bark and often somewhat thorny branches. Of several hundred named varieties, native to Europe. Cultivated for its fruit. Wood slightly tinged with red; strong, and of fine grain. P. communis. 5. Pyrus cydftnia, L. (quince. Common Quince-tree.) Leaves ovate, obtuse at base, entire, hairy beneath. Flowers solitary, large, 1 in., white or pale rose-color. Fruit large, hard, orange-yellow, of peculiar sour flavor; seeds mucilaginous; ripens in October. A low tree, 10 to 20 ft. high, with a crooked stem and rambling branches; from Europe. Several varieties in cultivation. P. oydonia. 8. Pyrus sambucifolia, Cham. & Schlecht. (elder-leaved Mountain-ash. ) Leaflets oblong, oval or lance-ovate, obtuse (sometimes abruptly sharp-pointed), usually doubly serrate with rather spreading teeth, generally pale beneath. Leaf-buds somewhat hairy. Flowers and berries larger, but in smaller clusters, than the preceding species. The berries globose when ripe, % in. broad, bright red. This species, much like Pyrus Americana, is found wild in northern New England and westward. 9. Pyrus aucuparia, Gaertn. (euroPean Mountain-ash, Or Rowan-tree.) Much like Pyrus Americana but the leaflets are paler and more obtuse, with their lower surface downy. Leaf-buds blunter and densely covered with hairs. Flowers larger, % in. or more in diameter. Fruit also much larger, sometimes nearly in. in diameter. Beautiful tree, 20 to 30 ft. high, often cultivated. Genus 38. CRAT-ffiGUS. Thorny shrubs or small trees with simple, alternate, serrate, doubly serrate or lobed leaves. Flowers cherrylike blossoms, usually white in color and growing in corymbs, generally on the ends of side shoots; in spring. Fruit a berry...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236523369
  • 9781236523365