A Treatise on Title-Pages, with Numerous Illustrations in Facsimile and Some Observations on the Early and Recent Printing of Books

A Treatise on Title-Pages, with Numerous Illustrations in Facsimile and Some Observations on the Early and Recent Printing of Books

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ... and sometimes in a narrowed measure. This matter is often inserted after the name and honors of the author, but in the crowded title-page it is always a superfluity. The Motto of many lines in small lower-case of roman or italic is another troublesome adjunct to a title-page. French printers set it in half measure, in very small lower-case letter, and put it on the right side of the page, leaving blank the other half. This treatment gives it distinction, but it makes the unbalanced and unsymmetrical page not approved by English readers. In a narrowed measure of small type, and in the centre of the measure, the motto can be inclosed in a hair-line rule; but this treatment (once common in German books) may THE COMEDIES OF PLAUTUS CONTAINING AULULARIA, TRINUMMUS, BACCHIDES, CURCULIO, ASINARIA, PSEUDOLUS, STICHUS, CAPTIVI, MILES GLORIOSUS, AND MENECHMI 286 Numerals preferred in title-pages be objected to as finical. When the motto follows the name of the author or translator, it may need before it a short hair-line dash. A motto of one or two lines only may be put at the top of the page in small capitals. (See page 279.) In the crowded title-page the addition of a motto, or of reasons for publication, or of specifications by the publisher of some peculiarity in the edition, is a hindrance to orderly composition. It makes the title huddled and harder to read quickly. The Name of an Editor or Translator often follows the name of the author in a separate line and in type a little smaller in size; but when the name of the author is made a part of the name of the book, as in The Bucolics of Virgil, translated by John Dryden, the name of the translator should have the prominence usually given to the author. THE CRITICAL PERIOD OF AMERICAN HISTORY...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123687059X
  • 9781236870599