A Treatise on Statics; Containing the Theory of the Eqilibrium of Forces and Numerous Examples Illustrative of the General Principles of the Science

A Treatise on Statics; Containing the Theory of the Eqilibrium of Forces and Numerous Examples Illustrative of the General Principles of the Science

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ... The Pulley; 3. The Wheel and Axle; 4. The Inclined Plane; 5. The Screw; 6. The Wedge. These are not the most simple machines; for, rods used in pushing, and cords used in pulling, are much more simple; in fact, every machine will be found to be a combination of levers, cords, and inclined planes, and these might consequently be called the simple Mechanical Powers, with much greater propriety than the six before mentioned. As, however, these are not very complicated in construction and application, and as levers, cords, and inclined planes do always, in actual practice, present themselves in machinery, in one or more of these six combinations, it will very much facilitate our enquiries into any proposed machine, to be acquainted with their forms and the advantages to be expected from their use. In speaking of any machine, the force which is applied to work it is called the working power, or, simply, the Power; the weight to be raised, or resistance to be overcome, is called the Weight; the point where the machine is applied to produce its effect is called the working point; and the fraction Weight Power i is called the Mechanical Advantage (by some authors the Power, but this creates confusion by confounding it with the former definition of power) of the machine. 187-Every machine is useless until put in motion, and therefore its parts ought to be so arranged and adapted that the given power may be able to overcome the proposed weight, and move it with the requisite degree of celerity; but, in discussing the theory of the Mechanical Powers, it will be sufficient to determine the ratio of the weight to the power when they balance each other, for then the slightest addition made to the power will cause it to preponderate and put the machine in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236539478
  • 9781236539472