A Treatise on a Section of the Strata, from Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, to the Mountain of Cross Fell, in Cumberland; With Remarks on Mineral Veins in General. Also, Tables of the Strata, in Yorkshire, Derbyshire, &C. to Which Is Added a

A Treatise on a Section of the Strata, from Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, to the Mountain of Cross Fell, in Cumberland; With Remarks on Mineral Veins in General. Also, Tables of the Strata, in Yorkshire, Derbyshire, &C. to Which Is Added a

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1821 edition. Excerpt: ... quite soft and loose, and being commonly mixed with lesser and greater globes and masses of ore and stone, the whole will frequently rush down with violence before, or in front of, their timber, to a greater height than they incline. A skilful miner does all he can to prevent the soil from running or washing down before his timbers, by driving in polins, or sharp-pointed stakes. He enters these' above the lintel or head tree, and'withoi1t the side posts of his foremost pair, and with his mallet drives them forward, past the square timbers, into the softness; and if a mass of ore, or any hard substance, retards the point of one of his polins, he draws it out of the way with his pick; and when the end of his polin is-freed, he drives again, until it is far enough up. When they are all driven as far up, or forward, as it is wished, he works out room to set another pair within those polins, and enters another course of polins, and soon; and, whether they advance horizontally, sink down, or rise upwards, in these' soft places, they must do all with square timbers, which is very troublesome and expensive; but it frequently happens, that the ore is so plentiful and good, in these veins. as abundantly to compensate for all this trouble and expense. The second sort of irregular rake vein, is called the waving vein. This is a rake vein, or perpendicular fissure, which opens and closes at very short distances. This vein is very near a-kin to_the last described, as it consists of bellies and twitches;= but the twitches are so numerous, and so near to one another, that there is neither room nor distance enough between them, for any of the bellies, in this vein, to open out to any considerable wideness, and, of course, this vein is never so...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236647386
  • 9781236647382