A Treatise on Protracted Indigestion and Its Consequences; Being the Application to the Practical Department of Medicine of the Results of an Inquiry Into the Laws of the Vital Functions

A Treatise on Protracted Indigestion and Its Consequences; Being the Application to the Practical Department of Medicine of the Results of an Inquiry Into the Laws of the Vital Functions : Addressed by the Author on His Retirement from the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...the brain and spinal marrow, I have pointed out my reasons for choosing a certain form of pulmonary consumption as an example of the diseases which supervene when the powers of the vital organs of the brain and spinal marrow have so failed that they can no longer supply the nervous influence necessary for the healthy maintenance of all the vital organs. The following observations, then, apply to hereditary pulmonary consumption, in consequence of its always being a secondary disease; while the pulmonary consumption which originates in the lungs themselves is of a very different nature, rarely occurring in this country, and requiring, we have seen, a very different plan of treatment. But whether the secondary consumption is or is not hereditary, it still requires the same plan of treatment, for the same secondary form of this disease may arise without any hereditary disposition, although this is much less frequently the case. Whether there be an hereditary disposition to weak lungs or not, the permanently distended state of the liver is, in these kingdoms, the cause of the pulmonary disease in at least nineteen cases out of twenty. When I first experienced the advantage of what I believe to be the only treatment capable, in such cases, of restoring tone to the digestive organs, I had no idea that this debility of these organs formed any part of the cause of the affection of the lungs. Nor was I convinced of this till 1 found, from many cases, that, on the one hand, in every instance in which I succeeded in restoring permanent vigor to the digestive organs, and where the affection of the lungs had not gone so far as to produce disorganisation, or so strong a tendency to it that there was not time for the necessary treatment, the consumptive...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236570227
  • 9781236570222