A Treatise on the Poor Law of England; Being a Review of the Origin and Various Alterations That Have Been Mad in the Law of Settlements and Removals

A Treatise on the Poor Law of England; Being a Review of the Origin and Various Alterations That Have Been Mad in the Law of Settlements and Removals

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...acquire a settlement in another not so good; and the evidence of a reverend gentleman is quoted in point. He had been requested to get a farming bailiff: he found a man in all respects qualified, working at 9s. a-week: " the situation was, in point of emolument, and comfort, and station, a considerable advance; his advantages would have been doubled." He at first agreed, but afterwards declined, in consequence, as the reverend witness understood, of his fearing to remove from what was considered a good parish to a bad one. What shall we say to this evidence, so rich? Is it not rather to be imagined that the reverend gentleman ww-understood the reason? Is it to be credited that a young stalwart country labourer at 9. a-week, in the vigour of his youth, with aspirations bursting into manhood, in all respects qualified for the situation of bailiff at double the wages, mopes about or concerning a parish? No; the lightness of his heart and prospects of prosperity before him leave settlements out of the question, for he hopes never to need one. Again, the same reverend gentleman " was requested by a poor man whom he respected, to find a situation for his son in London: the son was a strong young man, working at 8s. a-week." He succeeded in getting a good situation for him in London, at one guinea per week; but the young man " was not forthcoming." It appeared that he had altered his mind, as the reverend gentleman " understood, from a reluctance to endanger his settlement." Did not this opponent of settlements know full well that a guinea a-week was better than 8s 1 That a guinea a-week was not a yearly hiring, and that a weekly or monthly lodgings in London was not a yearly rental? Did not Mr. Edwin Chadwick...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236637968
  • 9781236637963