A Treatise on Ordnance and Armor; Embracing Descriptions, Discussions, and Professional Opinions Concerning the Material, Fabrication, Requirements, Capabilities, and Endurance of European and American Guns for Naval, Sea-Coast, and

A Treatise on Ordnance and Armor; Embracing Descriptions, Discussions, and Professional Opinions Concerning the Material, Fabrication, Requirements, Capabilities, and Endurance of European and American Guns for Naval, Sea-Coast, and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ... size. It is, unlike the other metals, capable of great variation in density, by the simple processes of hardening and annealing, and, therefore, of being adapted to the different degrees of elongation that it is subjected to, in either solid or built-up guns. 5. Bronze has greater ultimate tenacity than cast iron, but it has little more elasticity, and less homogeneity; it has a high degree of ductility, but it is the softest of cannon-metals, and is injuriously affected by the heat of high charges. The other alloys of copper are very costly, and their endurance, under high charges, is not determined. 6. In view of the duty demanded of modern guns, simple cast iron is too weak, although it can be used to advantage for jackets over steel tubes--a position where mass, small extensibility, and the cheap application of the trunnions and other projections, are the chief requirements. And, although cast-iron barrels, hooped with the best high wrought iron, and with low steel, cannot fulfil all the theoretical conditions of strength, and do not endure the highest charges, they have thus far proved trustworthy and efficient. Wrought iron, in large masses, cannot be trusted, and is, in all cases, too soft. Bronze is impracticably soft and destructible by heat. Low steel is, therefore (possibly in connection with cast iron, as stated above), by reason of the associated qualities which may be called strength and toughness, the only material from which we can hope to maintain resistance to the high pressures demanded in modern warfare. CHAPTER V. Rifling And Projectiles. Standard Forms And Practice Described. S09. The first comprehensive experiment with rifled cannon appears to have been made in Russia, about 1836, and consisted in firing 1800 rounds from a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 258 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 467g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236598733
  • 9781236598738