A Treatise on the Locomotive and the Air Brake; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools ... with Numerous Practical Questions Volume 1

A Treatise on the Locomotive and the Air Brake; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools ... with Numerous Practical Questions Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...be attempted until the end of the run. In this case, no excess pressure can be carried, and train-pipe pressure will have to be regulated by means of the pump throttle. 64. Feed-Valve Piston Sticking.--Trouble is some-' times experienced in removing piston 74, on account of its sticking. In such a case, proceed as follows: Remove the supply valve 63 as described, and replace the cap nut 65; unscrew the spring case 69, grasp the stem 66 of the piston in the right hand, and move the brake-valve handle carefully to running position. Main-reservoir pressure acting on top of piston 74 will blow it out. 'When replacing the piston, be sure that packing ring 67 works freely, and do not bruise it by pounding in getting the piston back. 65. Leaky Feed-Valve Case Gasket.---A ' leak sometimes occurs in the gasket 27, between the feed ports f' f" and 2', which allows main-reservoir air to pass directly into the train pipe when the brake valve is in running position. This can sometimes be stopped by simply tightening the nuts of the feed-valve studs, view (e). If it cannot, then close the cut-out cock under the brake valve, place the valve in service position, remove the feed-valve case from the brake-valve body, and replace the blown-out gasket with a temporary one made of pasteboard, part of an old felt hat, or of anything similar that is at hand. 66. Leaky Train-Pipe Exhaust Valve.--Sometimes the train-pipe exhaust valve E is held from its seat by dirt or gum. This causes a continual blow at the exhaust valve, and, consequently, when the brake valve is on lap the brakes will gradually set harder. It may be possible to close the train-pipe exhaust valve by quickly moving the brake valve from full release to emergency and back again a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123690432X
  • 9781236904324