A Treatise on the Law of Assessments; Wherein Are Considered Assessments Constituting the Basis of General Taxation, from Their Inception to Completion; Assessments by Municipal Corporations, for Street and Other Public Local

A Treatise on the Law of Assessments; Wherein Are Considered Assessments Constituting the Basis of General Taxation, from Their Inception to Completion; Assessments by Municipal Corporations, for Street and Other Public Local

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...power. This becomes manifest, and we think, indisputable when that portion of the section is read with the following clause: ' Except such property as two thirds of both houses of the legislature may think proper to exempt from taxation.' This clause was inserted for some purpose. It cannot be said that it was added without any object, without design, and merely to round a period. It must have been added, because the framers of the instrument understood that without it the previous portion of the section required a property tax to be levied upon all property without exception, and that the clause was necessary in order to enable the legislature to exempt any description of property from the operation of the general rule of taxation. By a slight change among the members of the sentence, but still retaining the same sense, it will read: 'All property in the state, except such property as two thirds of both houses of the legislature may think proper to exempt from taxation, shall be taxed in proportion to its value, to be ascertained as directed by law.' read in that manner it is evident that the section is a-limitation upon the power of the legislature to exempt from taxation, any kind or parcel of property', unless exempted in the mode therein described, and that the clause was inserted as a relaxation of the general and imperative rule embodied in the previous words of the section. Accepting as a fact that our constitutional convention borrowed the first part of the section relating to taxation from the constitution of Texas, and seeing that the clause in that constitution permitting the legislature to exempt property from taxation is omitted from our constitution, the conclusionis inevitable that it was not...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 517g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123686221X
  • 9781236862211