A Treatise on Equitation or the Art of Horsemanship, Simplified Progressively for Amateurs; Forming Complete Lessons for Training Horses, and Instructions for Beginners

A Treatise on Equitation or the Art of Horsemanship, Simplified Progressively for Amateurs; Forming Complete Lessons for Training Horses, and Instructions for Beginners

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ... must be taken so that it is put on without impeding the natural position of the horse's head and preventing his carrying himself properly, but merely to check him from throwing his head too high or back. During any leap the martingal must be let loose. The foregoing remarks have been amply supported by the several Hunts in England, who have abolished all sorts of martingals, as dangerous, in their sports. CHAPTER IX. ON THE STEADYING OF HORSES FOR FIRING SMALL ARMS; AND THE PRACTICES OF DRUMS, FLAGS, LANCES, &C. &C--ON THE TURNINGS RIGHT, LEFT, ABOUT, AND ON THE HORSE'S CENTRE, FORE. AND HINDQUARTERS. The horse having been established in the obedience of the aids, both rider and his horse are become well acquainted with each other, and it is now time to begin to make the horse familiar with those sorts of noises and objects he may hitherto have been a perfect stranger to: such as firing, drums, flags, paper, letters, reports, lances, swords, &c. &c. Too much care and precaution cannot be observed on this subject, and the training of every horse should be commenced with, as if he were perfectly raw and ignorant. Every day, before dismissal, the horse should be formed up, or halted, at one extremity of the riding-house or ground; and, if in company with already trained horses, so much the better, as their example of steadiness may induce him to overcome much of his natural timidity, or actual aversion, to strange and violent noises, or of unsteady objects, such as flags, papers, &c. &c. This operation cannot be commenced with too much care. Put but little pow der in the pan at first, for the horses to see the flash, at a distance, two or three times; then let them move up to the place where the man had flashed the pan, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123655535X
  • 9781236555359