A Treatise on the Diseases of Women; Their Symptoms and Treatment, or Physiology of the Female Organs of Generation and Reproduction, Both Animal and Vegetable, Written with Especial Reference to the Menses and the Morbid Conditions

A Treatise on the Diseases of Women; Their Symptoms and Treatment, or Physiology of the Female Organs of Generation and Reproduction, Both Animal and Vegetable, Written with Especial Reference to the Menses and the Morbid Conditions

By (author) 

List price: US$10.10

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...that the menstrual flow was the evacuation of some injurious substance from the blood, without which a woman could not maintain good health; and then, from this course of reasoning, premature cessation of the courses was thought to have the most dreadful effects on the general constitution, or on some of the organs of generation. But we find that the menstrual flux is the result of well known changes taking place in the ovaries and other organs of generation. Ilence those opinions have been considerably modified, for we now consider the menstrual flow not a disease, or the result of a disease, but the result of natural changes going on in the ovaries, and the discharge from the genital organs is only the sign of that natural condition.. We do not deny, however, that a sudden suppression of the menses will bring on the worst consequences, locally and generally; but we must remember that no harm results from a case of early cessation of the menses when having made their appearance two or three years before their natural time. Now we find, by exploration of the genital organs, that a great many changes that We find in their structure that were considered or attributed to the cessation of the menses, should not be so attributed to their effect, but to their cause. Now, if we were making up our conclusions on this point, it would be very important to know whether in spite of the cessation of the courses, the ovaries did, or did not, go ahead and produce and ripen the egg; for the courses would only be suppressed when it was impossible for the en _ gorged bloodvessels to discharge their blood. VVe cannot fail to see that such engorgements of the m1cous membrane of the womb, without a discharge, could not fail to do harm; but the most of those...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236935691
  • 9781236935694