A Treatise on Astronomical Spectroscopy; Being a Translation of Die Spectralanalyse Der Gestirne by Professor Dr. J. Scheiner ... Tr., REV. and Enl., with the Cooperation of the Author, by Edwin Brant Frost ....

A Treatise on Astronomical Spectroscopy; Being a Translation of Die Spectralanalyse Der Gestirne by Professor Dr. J. Scheiner ... Tr., REV. and Enl., with the Cooperation of the Author, by Edwin Brant Frost ....

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ... Saturn exerted a general absorption in the blue and violet, which is especially strong near the equatorial belt. He also made the interesting observation that the band in the red is lacking, or extremely faint, in the spectrum of the rings, whence the conclusion that the rings possess little or no atmosphere. There seem to be no other early observations of Saturn, except a note by Janssen, + who, while observing the spectrum of-our atmosphere from the very favorable station of the summit of Etna, also examined Mars and Saturn and found that aqueous vapor was present in both. Keeler t has recently investigated the spectrum of Saturn's rings with the great Lick refractor, and while he could recognize a considerable number of Fraunhofer lines he was unable to detect the slightest trace of the dark band in the red. There can, therefore, be no atmosphere about the rings. 7. The Spectrum of Uranus The spectrum of Uranus is so faint that it is scarcely possible to recognize the strongest Fraunhofer lines by visual observations. Despite the faintness, however, several dark liands can be readily seen, thus indicating a very powerful absorption. Seechi -early discerned that the spectrum of Uranus possesses little similarity with that of the sun, but the positions he assigns to the bands cannot be reconciled with the concordant observations of Huggins and Vogel. The observations of JTuggins commence farther toward the red, while Vogel's extend more toward the violet; but in the portions of the spectrum Phil. Trans. Vol. 154, Part li, p. 243 (1804). t Rapport sur une Mission en italie, dans les Alpes et en Grfece. Paris, 1868. Comptes Rendus LXTV, p. 1304. Ast. Nach. Bd. 122, p. 401. i Comptes Rendus LXVlii, p. 761. II Proc. R. S. XiX, p. 488...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236868412
  • 9781236868411