A Treatise on the Art of Breeding and Managing Tame, Domesticated, and Fancy Pigeons; Carefully Compiled from the Best Authors, with Observations, Containing All That Is Necessary to Be Known of Tame, Domesticated, and Fancy Pigeons

A Treatise on the Art of Breeding and Managing Tame, Domesticated, and Fancy Pigeons; Carefully Compiled from the Best Authors, with Observations, Containing All That Is Necessary to Be Known of Tame, Domesticated, and Fancy Pigeons

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ... my short-faced Almonds and black mottled Tumblers, but on reflection considered it too coarse, that it would wrench the beak, I caused it to be offered to the shops for sale, none of them would give more than a shilling or eighteen pence for it; I thought it more valuable at that time, and put it back into the cocks' loft; acountry gentleman noticed it for its bronze feather, I mentioned to him if he would accept it. He accepted it. It was the first, and I believe will be the last, if it was possible that I could remain in the Fancy for the next fifty years, unless I became in my second childhood. does not mention, viz., the Magpie, the common Runt, the Archangel, the L With regard to the Porcelain Pigeons, I never saw but one pair, black ground and most beautifully mottled; differently mottled to the black mottled Tumbler; they were in a basket, placed rather high and out of my reach, and writing from memory. The Fancier has his work to do if he intends to make ita valuable bird, and cause it to be admired by the gentlemen of the Fancy. The best thing I think he can aim at, is to cross it with a Carrier, and by perseverance, in time, to obtain the Carrier with its beautiful formed long-faced, straight narrow head with a dent in the centre, retaining its beautitul mottled plumage; unless this or something else be done with this bird, it will not be thought anything more of by good Fanciers than the Archangels. With regard to what there is in a name, I do not think that it is correct to suppose, that because a bird is called an Archangel that it must follow that it came from Russia; or a Pigeon is called an Antwerp, that it must of necessity be originally bred at Antwerp (more in its place when I come to give an account of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236875788
  • 9781236875785