A Treatise on Agriculture, Comprising a Concise History of Its Origin and Progress; The Present Condition of the Art Abroad and at Home, and the Theory and Practice of Husbandry. to Which Is Added, a Dissertation on the Kitchen and Fruit

A Treatise on Agriculture, Comprising a Concise History of Its Origin and Progress; The Present Condition of the Art Abroad and at Home, and the Theory and Practice of Husbandry. to Which Is Added, a Dissertation on the Kitchen and Fruit

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...or maturing their fruit. 3d. The preparation of the soil is not to be neglected, and any summer crop in rows and well cultivated forms a good one. With these remarks we return to our general head of planting. The form in which your trees stand is not matter of indifference. The quincunx is recommended as giving to them that position which is relatively best; but the caize (straight lines intersecting each other), better admitting the movements of the plough, is generally preferred. Whichever of the two be adopted, the holes indicated in a former part of this section must be made accordingly, and ought to be six feet wide and as many long, and two feet deep. The advantages of these will abundantly repay the extra labour they require, as we find by M. Chalumeau's experiments on peach-trees, from which we make the following extract: "Four peach-trees, resembling each other, as to size and vigour of growth, as much as possible, were planted: No. 1 in a hole three feet square; No. 2 in a hole two feet square; and Nos. 3 and 4 in holes eighteen inches square. The soil and exposition similar. No. 1 has every year given the most abundant crops, and the relative sizes of the trees now are as follows: the stem of No. 1, 18 feet high and eight inches in circumference; that of No. 2, nine feet high and five and a half inches in circumference; No. 3, six feet high, and three inches eight lines in circumference; and No. 4, five and a half feet high, and three inches in circumference." Here is a difference between the largest and smallest of five inches in circumference and 12 1-2 feet in height; a most decisive proof of the advantages of trenching. When the holes are thus prepared, and at a distance not less than 30 feet from each other, and a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236640314
  • 9781236640314