The Treasury of History, Being a History of the World; Comprising a General History, Both Ancient and Modern, of All the Principal Nations of the Globe, Their Rise, Progress, Present Condition, Etc

The Treasury of History, Being a History of the World; Comprising a General History, Both Ancient and Modern, of All the Principal Nations of the Globe, Their Rise, Progress, Present Condition, Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...quite as heavy, and perhaps even more painful. CHAPTER XXXIII. THE REIGN OK EDWARD IV. Trocbh Edward was now only in his twentieth year, he had already given proofs of activity, courage and a very determined purpose; to which we must add. that almost the very first act of his reign showed that if he were more prompt and resolute than his father, he was also by far more violent and sanguinary. A citizen of London had the sign of the crown above his shop, and jocularly said that his son should be "heir to the crown." Anything more harmless than this jocular speech, or more obvious than the tradesman's real meaning, it would not be easy to imagine. But Edward, jealous of his title and feeling himself insecure upon the throne, gave a treasonable interpretation to a merry joke, insisted that it had a derisive allusion to himself, and actually had the unfortunate man condemned for treason--and executed! This brutal murder w'as a fitting prelude to the scenes of slaughter with which the kingdom was soon filled; and plainly proclaimed that Margaret had now to deal with an opponent to the full as truculent and unsparing as herself. The nation was divided into Lancastrians and Yorkists, the former bearing the symbol of the red. the latter of the white rose; and as though the blood shed in actual fight were insufficient to allay the tiger--ike desire of the principal opponents, the scaffolds were dyed deeply wih the blood of the prisoners taken by either party. Margaret's popularity in the northern counties had enabled her to get together an army of sixty thousand men, with which she took post in Yorkshire, whither Edward and the earl of Warwick hastened to meet her. On arriving at Pontefract, Edward despatched Lord Fitzwalter with a detachment to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 490 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 25mm | 866g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236658361
  • 9781236658364