The Treasury of Botany; A Popular Dictionary of the Vegetable Kingdom with Which Is Incorporated a Glossary of Botanical Terms Volume 1

The Treasury of Botany; A Popular Dictionary of the Vegetable Kingdom with Which Is Incorporated a Glossary of Botanical Terms Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ...than water, and called conia. It exists in all parts of the plant, but especially In the fruits. It acts flrst as an irritant poison, but speedily causes paralysis of all the muscles, convulsions and death. The plant is of course much less dangerous than its extract, but in poisonous doses it produces similar symptoms, and sometimes coma, and other effects like those produced by opium. Medicinally Conium has been used I for promoting the absorption of tumors, j and glandular swellings, and as an anti-j spasmodic and anodyne. r_M. T. M. CONJUGATE. A trihe of green-spored AigtB distinguished from Covfervaceas by their endochrome being spiral, stellate, or otherwise disposed, and not equally diffused, or simply denser in the centre; and by the large zoospores formed by the union of the endochromes of two contiguous cells, or one divided into two for the purposes of fructification in the same or in two different plants. In a few, impregnation is effected, in the manner described under BuVbockate, by means of free antheridia, which ultimately fix themselves near the spore-bearing cell. In some instances the bodies perfected by impregnation undergo cell-division, and the component parts become so many eoospores. The species are either attached or float freely In the water. Almost all are fresh-water plants, and are found In various parts of the globe, but especially iu temperate regions. The term Conjvpatm does not strictly apply to all. In JEdogoninm there Is no conjugation, but fructiAcation takes place by the division of a cell, one of the two divisions only proving fertile. In this genus, as also in some others, the spores are often of a brilliant scarlet or vermilion. The same The Hemlock is an erect branching bien-I spore, however, may be, in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 580 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,021g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236548949
  • 9781236548948