The Treasury of Botany; A Popular Dictionary of the Vegetable Kingdom; With Which Is Incorporated a Glossary of Botanical Terms Volume 1

The Treasury of Botany; A Popular Dictionary of the Vegetable Kingdom; With Which Is Incorporated a Glossary of Botanical Terms Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...The roots are large and succulent, and yield the only yellow dye with which the people are acquainted. It is a common plant on the river Quorra.' Another species, 0'. tinctorium, a native of Senegambia, is said to have a thick tuberous root-stock, which furnishes a yellow dye, known to the natives as Fayar, and used for dying cotton stuffs, as well as in medicine in cases of amenorrlitea. The flowers of this only are known, and very likely it is not dliferent from the last-mentioned species. The woolly covering of the seeds gives rise to the name of the genus. A. A. B. COCOS. The well-known Cocoa-nut tree is the type of this genus of palms, to which, in addition, about a dozen other species belong. They mostly form tall graceful trees, and the majority of them are natives of the tropical regions of America, one only, the common Cocoa-nut, being found in and pinnate. Their flowers are of separate sexes produced on the same spike, both having a calyx consisting of three sepals, and a corolla of three petals, the males containing six stamens united at the base, and the females an egg-shaped ovary, with a short style and three stiginas, and sonie times six barren stamens. The fruit is either elliptical, or egg-shaped and tlireesided, and contains a single seed enclosed in a hard bony shell, whicli has three round holes at its base, and is surrounded by a dry fibrous husk. The Cocoa-nut Palm, 6'. nucifem, is now so extensively cultivated throughout the tropics, that it is impossible to ascertain its native country; there can be no doubt, however, that it is indigenous to some part of Asia, probably Southern India. It exists in vast quantities on the Malabar and Coromandel coasts, and adjacent islands, nn--growing in the greatest luxuriance upon...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 816g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236824636
  • 9781236824639