Travels in Western India, Embracing a Visit to the Sacred Mounts of the Jains, and the Most Celebrated Shrines of Hindu Faith Between Rajpootana and the Indus; With an Account of the Ancient City of Nehrwalla

Travels in Western India, Embracing a Visit to the Sacred Mounts of the Jains, and the Most Celebrated Shrines of Hindu Faith Between Rajpootana and the Indus; With an Account of the Ancient City of Nehrwalla

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...of value in art or science, in every country which they subjected. I have elsewhere stated, that so early as the eighth century, the arms of Islam were both on the Indus and the Ebro; but where did the Arab learn to turn this arch? Not from the Visigoth in Spain, nor from the architraved edifices of the ancient Greeks or Persians;--not from Tadmor in the desert, nor from Persepolis; neither from Hauran nor from Haleb. Did they then invent and spread it over Europe; or did they acquire the knowledge of it from the Silpi, or architect of the Hindus, who had their Vitruvius before Romulus was born? Of one thing we are confident, that this arch was erected by a Hindu mason, and that its ornaments are pure Hindu, and if the Arabians had anything to do with it, their merit was confined to the design. Can we reasonably concede even so much to probability? We know that the Mooslem never ruled in Patun; that when the race of Taka obtained Guzzerat, they almost immediately changed the metropolis; nor was it by any means likely, that after Alia, from religious frenzy, had thrown down Annals of Rajast'han, vol. i. p. 243. its its mindras and its walls, any prince of Islam would rebuild them for a Hindu to inhabit. The character of this architecture is of a much earlier date, being nearly that of the Ghorian dynasties preceding Alia, which afterwards gradually softened down until it attained the florid embellishments, and effeminate though striking distinctions, of the Mogul. The varied conceptions of the pointed style, in Europe, are much less easy to discriminate than those of the Indo-Saracenic, a term we may be permitted to use, in order to distinguish it from the simple Saracenic, as found in the Western conquests of the Arabians, who, as they and their...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236489586
  • 9781236489586