Travels in Various Countries of the East; More Particularly Persia. a Work Wherein the Author Has Described, as Far as His Own Observations Extended, the State of Those Countries in 1810, 1811, and 1812 and Has Endeavoured to Illustrate

Travels in Various Countries of the East; More Particularly Persia. a Work Wherein the Author Has Described, as Far as His Own Observations Extended, the State of Those Countries in 1810, 1811, and 1812 and Has Endeavoured to Illustrate

By (author) 

List price: US$22.63

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1821 edition. Excerpt: ...they had rendered tributary. Navigation could have been but little practised by the Persians while their religion taught them that it was impious to contaminate rivers or the sea, even by spitting. (Herodot. I. 138. Plm. Nat. Hist. XXX, 2). Some rare Oriental Manuscripts furnish anecdotes respecting the naval affairs of Persia in early ages; but this subject must be resumed hereafter.. 8. Nor any arches; although several appear in that extraordinary View of Persepolis etched by the celebrated Hollar, and already noticed, (Vol. I. pref. p. xxiii), as partly the () "On ne voit point de figures de femmcs sur les monumens des Perse." Hish de 1 Art de 1'Antiq. Tome I. p. 126, (Leipzig, 1781). offspring of imagination; it illustrates the Travels of Sir Thomas Herbert, (third edition, 1665). One arch, also, is erroneously represented in the View given by Heer Herbert de Jager, in Valentyn's Dutch Collection of Voyages, (Vol. V. 221), a large and handsome engraving, of which, however, this is not the only fault. The doors and windows at the Takht are constructed as in PI. XLI, fig. 7-It is probable that arches were not introduced into the works of Persian Princes until the third or fourth century. Morier has delineated one among the ruins of Sh&p&r; others are found in the mountain near Kirmdnshdh, (See Olivier); and according to Ives's view, the palace of Chosroes or KnusRau, now called T6k i Kesra, (about twenty miles from Baghdad), still exhibits a multiplicity of arches. 9-Nor any human figure sitting cross-legged, or resting on the knees and heels, according to modern usage in Persia. The only figure represented sitting is the king; he appears 011 several pilasters, (See PI. XLI, fig. 8). His chair is very high, and he sits in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 138 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 259g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236624718
  • 9781236624710