Travels in Various Countries of the East, More Particularly Persia; A Work Wherein the Author Has Described, as Far as His Own Observations Extended, the State of Those Countries in 1810, 1811, and 1812 and Has Endeavoured to Volume . 1

Travels in Various Countries of the East, More Particularly Persia; A Work Wherein the Author Has Described, as Far as His Own Observations Extended, the State of Those Countries in 1810, 1811, and 1812 and Has Endeavoured to Volume . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1819 edition. Excerpt: ...or placing the nine digits so that they shall make the sum of. "fifteen every way thus; 2 9 4 7 5 3 species once rested on a vessel in which Mr. Bruce was passing between Bombay and the Straits of Hormuz; and those insects in a short time consumed so much of the sails as to render them almost useless. Millions, it is said, perish in the sea; incalculably more than those which reach the land. This to me seems not incredible; for when the cloud of locusts first arrived, I picked up several which had fallen from it on the ground, evidently exhausted and incapable of a longer flight. On the eighteenth another cloud of them appeared; and we were annoyed in the camp for some days after, by frequent and sudden whirlwinds, which almost suffocated us with sand, and rendered the air so hot that even at night the thermometer rose to 80 and 81. Yet we availed ourselves of some fine intervals in making excursions along the sea-shore, and exploring the desert. I visited the remains of Rishahr, a town once more extensive, there is reason to believe, than that which succeeded it as the bander, (jjja) or principal commercial port of Pars. Indeed, if we may credit local tradition, one class alone of its inhabitants must have nearly equalled in number the present population of Bushehr; for it comprised, as old persons of the neighbourhood say, above seven hundred families employed in cutting and polishing carnelions and other ornamental stones; which, it is affirmed, were not originally produced here; but brought in their rough state from Combat/ in India. That a manufactory of carnelion beads once flourished at Rishahr, is highly probable, from the multiplicity of fragments dug up among its ruins, and profusely scattered over the adjacent plain. Of many...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575970
  • 9781236575975