Travels in Lower Canada, with the Author's Recollections of the Soil, and Aspect; The Morals, Habits, and Religious Institutions, of That Country

Travels in Lower Canada, with the Author's Recollections of the Soil, and Aspect; The Morals, Habits, and Religious Institutions, of That Country

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1820 edition. Excerpt: ...in the comforts of the French hotel, to which I had been directed.--Did not think it worth while to change even for the mansion-house, late the residence of Sir John Johnson. Tired myself almost off my legs with perambulating the streets and lanes--Suffered excessively with the heat, (to my conviction that it might occasionally be hot in Canada) and would have set out immediately for New York, if I should not have been too early for the next steam-boat. The thermometer was now, on the 19th clay of July, at ninety-six degrees of Fahrenheit. Reaumur was quoted at an ale-house where I stopped for refreshment, at twenty-eight and three-quarters, which answers to ninety-seven of Fahrenheit, a degree of heat at which spermaceti melts, and at the next elevation of the scale ether boils. In the evening, however, I cooled myself delightfully in a floating-bath that is moored oft-Windmill Point; and the next morning my spirits were restored by writing home and making the necessary preparation for my approaching departure, which was to be the next day: the weather having in the mean time become very cool and pleasant, after refreshing showers j a change which I had predicted at the table d'hote, from the very extremity of the heat, agreeable to the wellknown remark with us, that extreme weather seldom lasts longer than three days. But I did not find that the opinion gained confidence. It appeared to have heretofore escaped observation; nor did any one notice the fulfilment of the prediction but myself when it took place, as it usually happens with voluntary prognostications. But a French confectioner, at whose house I called occasionally, had known the thermometer at Pondicherry as high as a hundred and two. He was a man of observation, and remarking my...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236577191
  • 9781236577191