Travels in Koordistan, Mesopotamia, Etc; Including an Account of Parts of Those Countries Hitherto Unvisited by Europeans Volume 2

Travels in Koordistan, Mesopotamia, Etc; Including an Account of Parts of Those Countries Hitherto Unvisited by Europeans Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ... I could see in many places the little crocusses and other bulbs sprouting forth and just breaking the moist earth. But scarcely less pleasant to my eyes was the sight of the great Elbruz chain of mountainsall sugar-white as they were; for they heralded my near approach to the capital, where were my friends and associates, where I should hear of home and relatives, and where, as I trusted, all my anxieties and perplexities were to cease. I recognised several familiar summits----the noble mountain of Shemeroon, and those more immediately above the J ajerood river, were pre-eminent--but the grand Demawund had veiled his face in clouds. We found all the villages of this district nearly deserted and utterly despoiled of corn and straw, and almost all the means of sustenance for man and beast. The horses of the Royal Artillery had been quartered here; and having, like locusts, eaten the place bare, had taken flight to devour another district. I was concerned to hear that no account had been taken of the grain and fodder thus seized for the king, and that the villagers despaired even of having it brought to their credit in the settlement of their annual taxes. It is true that I have learned to distrust, in a great measure, the complaints and exparte statements of Persian Ryots! I know that there is almost always a contest of finesse between them and their masters--on the one part to conceal, on the other to extort; but the aspect of the villages told too surely a tale that ought not to have been heard at the commencement of a new reign, and which cannot but tend to alienate the minds of men from the young sovereign. Distress, however, had not increased the honesty of the villagers of Assiawbeg--their charges for all I had of them surpassed even...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236943503
  • 9781236943507