Travel and Adventure in the Territory of Alaska; Formerly Russian America--Now Ceded to the United States--And in Various Other Parts of the North Pacific Volume 3

Travel and Adventure in the Territory of Alaska; Formerly Russian America--Now Ceded to the United States--And in Various Other Parts of the North Pacific Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...Ivan's barabba" (house). It was a very wretched place, and we found it temporarily occupied by an Indian, with wife and child, whose apparent possessions no beggar could covet. Yet they appeared happy; for did they not know that on the morrow the hares and ptarmigan could be' snared, the deer hunted with a little more-exertion, and that if they were positively "hard up" they could get all they wanted for subsistence at the nearest village? A little tobacco and a few trifles were given them, and from them we obtained a light sledge, standing no more than fifteen inches above the ground, to be used by us for transporting our blankets and light possessions. On the 8th snow fell thickly, and travelling was so difii 186 USE or Snow-Snons. cult that with our best exertions we did not make ten miles during the day. We camped, thoroughly worn out. Although the use of snow-shoes renders travelling possible where otherwise it would hardly be so, they are very fatiguing in soft or soggy snow. The difference may be stated thus: whereas without them you might sink in three or ' four feet, with them you only sink as many inches. But in certain conditions of climate the snow-shoes get loaded with adhering snow and ice, and then every time you raise your foot you have to lift 10 or 15 lbs. extra. The shoes have to be consequently shaken, or otherwise cleared, at such times. ' The morning of the 9th broke fine and clear, with a temperature of +4 Fahr., andwe travelled with greater ease through level country diversified by low rises, from which we could see the break in the hills toward the Yukon. Our Indian, proceeding a good way ahead, shot several ptarmigan, and we made a fair d'ay's journey of eighteen miles before...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236831659
  • 9781236831651