The Translator, English Into French; Selections from the Best English Prose Writers, with Principles of Translation, Idiomatic Phrases, and Notes

The Translator, English Into French; Selections from the Best English Prose Writers, with Principles of Translation, Idiomatic Phrases, and Notes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ... to be alarmed for the event, " give us our respective shares, and wo are satisfied."--"If you are satisfied," returned the monkey, "justice is not7 a case of this intricate nature is by no means so easily determined." Upon which he continued to nibble first at one piece and then the other, till the poor cats, seeing their cheese gradually diminishing, entreated him to give himself no farther trouble, but deliver to them what remained.--"Not so fast, I beseech you, friends," replied the monkey; "we owe justice to ourselves as well as to you; what remains is due to me in right of my office." Upon which he crammed the whole into his mouth, and with great gravity dismissed the court.8 (DODSLEY, 1703--1704, ) THE YOILNG PHILOSOPHER. (MR. LOYELL AND THE BOY.) Mr. L. was one morning riding by himself,1 when, dismounting2 to gather a plant in the hedge, his horse got loose,3 and galloped away before him. He followed, calling the horse by name, but it was in vain. At length a little boy in a neighboring meadow, seeing the affair,4 ran across5 where the road made a turn,6 and getting before the horse, took him by the bridle, and held him till his owner came up. Mr. L. looked at the boy, and admired his ruddy, cheerful countenance.7 "Thank you, my good lad," said he, "you have caught8 my horse very cleverly. What shall I give you for your trouble?"9 Putting his hand into his pocket. " I want nothing, sir," said the boy. Mr. L. Don't you?10 so much the better for you. Few men can say as much.11 But, pray,12 what were you doing in the field? Boy. I was tending the sheep. Mr. L. And do you like this employment? B. Yes, very well, this fine weather.13 Mr. L. But had you not rather play?14 B. This is not hard work; it is almost as good15 as play. Mr. L. "Who set...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236662881
  • 9781236662880