Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects Volume 47, PT. 2

Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects Volume 47, PT. 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...words "think best," add the sentence--"They certainly agree with the diagram in the Naval Chronicle." Collingwood went into action, and would thus be about three miles astern when the battle commenced. The Spartiate, on Nelson's side, went into action two hours and thirty-one minutes after the Victory, and would be nearly four miles astern. The times in the table also show that Collingwood had 8 ships close together against 14 of the enemy, and Nelson had 6 against 12 of the enemy. After that Nelson had to wait about one hour before the next lot of his ships came up. I think that this fixing of the actual times is a matter of interest, and may help us to understand the battle which Admiral Sir E. Fremantle suggests we should study. Admiral Sir Edmund Fremantle: How many ships did you say Nelson had? Mr. Stromeyer: Practically 6 ships to attack 12. I cannot give you the names now, but they can be picked out of the list which I have prepared. I have also tried to extract information from the published logs as to the positions of the English fleets before the commencement of the battle, but the result, although encouraging, is not very satisfactory. Many ships did not even log the enemy's position, and several have unquestionably made serious mistakes, while generally a difference of a point or two does not seem to have been considered of importance. Thus the Defence reports the French as being S., but probably meant E. The Conqueror probably saw them S.E., and not N.E., as logged; while the Temeraire could hardly have seen the French S.E. if the Victory was previously sighted N.N.W. Even after making allowances for these errors and shifting ships' positions by a point, so as to bring them into some reasonable order, I...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123688339X
  • 9781236883391