Transactions of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Illinois with Reports from County and District Agricultural Organizations for the Year Volume 34

Transactions of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Illinois with Reports from County and District Agricultural Organizations for the Year Volume 34

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...be done at very slight expense. At New City, in Sangamon county, twelve miles south of Springfield, three plumtrees and thirteen pears (Clapp's favorite and Garber) belonging to Mr. Henry Archer were badly infested with the scale. These trees were said by the owner to be grafts from a nursery at Louisiana, Mo., but as he had received many trees from New Jersey whose location he was not sure of, it seems probable, on the whole, that this was the source of the scale. 'The owner promised to root up and burn the trees marked for destruction by Mr. Blair, but did not feel that he could afford to disinfect his entire twoacre orchard with whale-oil soap. At Auburn, in this same county, nineteen miles south of Springfield, we found five acres of fruit trees belonging to Mr. I. N. Lowe, among which two plumtrees, eight apple-, eight pear-, and eleven peach-trees, all imported from New Jersey about five years' ago, were found so badly infested by the San Jose scale that the owner was advised to dig them up and burn them. The osage orange hedge beside this orchard plot was also seriously attacked. It would probably require six hundred pounds of whale-oil soap to destroy the scale on these premises, together with a good force-pump, twenty feet of hose, and other appliances not now in Mr. Lowe's possession. To raise the fifty dollars or so which a thorough disinfection of this orchard would require, the owner assured us that he would have to haul corn to market at thirteen cents a bushel. Two and a half miles east of Tower Hill, in Shelby county, we found two hundred New Jersey pear-trees and eight hundred others, together with apples, blackberries, etc., mostly from Illinois. Five of the New Jersey trees were badly...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236922387
  • 9781236922380