Transactions of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Illinois with Reports from County and District Agricultural Organizations for the Year Volume 19

Transactions of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Illinois with Reports from County and District Agricultural Organizations for the Year Volume 19

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...us consider some of the processes of nature, and learn from them her requirements. If we plant the seed of a maple, chestnut, linden, oak or ash tree by itself in the open ground in suitable soil, and sufier it to grow without molestation, simply guarding it from injury, we shall find that the first act of the young plant is to send out broad leaves, which serve among other purposes to'shade completely the stem, and the ground immediately around it in which the roots are growing. As the tree grows, it preserves a symmetrical shape, the limbs spreading and the trunk increasing in size, in proportion to its height, but always preserving the condition of keeping the trunk and the ground for a considerable distance around it, in the shadow of the foliage till mature age, when the roots have penetrated to such a depth as to be safe from injury, and the trunk is protected by thick layers of cork-like bark, which safely guards alike from heat and cold the inner layers and young wood in which the sap is performing its functions. Such are the conditions to which nature adheres, if not interfered with by accident or design, and such, therefore, we may be sure, are those best adapted to healthy and vigorous growth. The fact that they are continually violated with apparent impunity, serves only to show the wonderful power of nature to supply deficiencies, and adapt herself to circumstances, but in artificial culture, we should aim as nearly as possible to imitate the course she would pursue if unimpeded. The requirements of nature are of course the same when trees are growing together in a forest, as when they stand singly, but the conditions of growth are so changed that the end is attained by entirely different means. If we enter a tract of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 318 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 572g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123688096X
  • 9781236880963