Training for the Public Profession of the Law; Historical Development and Principal Contemporary Problems of Legal Education in the United States with Some Account of Conditions in England and Canada

Training for the Public Profession of the Law; Historical Development and Principal Contemporary Problems of Legal Education in the United States with Some Account of Conditions in England and Canada

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...was much sought after by law students. Among these was Samuel J. Hitchcock, who was admitted to the bar in 1815 and taken in by Staples as partner in his law firm in 1817. In 1824 Judge Daggett succeeded Staples as senior partner in the now established "school," and affiliation was secured with Yale College (Chapter XIII). Sylvester Gilbert, a pupil of Jesse Root (Chapter XII), conducted a school at Hebron from 1810 to 1816, with a total attendance of fifty-six. Judge Zephaniah Swift, who succeeded Reeve of Litchfield as Chief Justice in 1815, and died in 1833, conducted a law school at Windham. i Massachusetts Judge Samuel Howe, a Litchfield student in 1805, started in 1893, with an assistant, a school at Northampton. In 1897 John Hooker Ashmun was called in to assist. When the Harvard law school was reorganized in 1829 Ashmun was taken over, and this, with Judge Howe's death, killed the school (Chapter XIII). Theron Metcalf, a Litchfield student in 1806, opened a school at Dedham in 1828, undoubtedly killed at once by Harvard competition. Samuel F. Dickinson in the summer of 1828 and again in 1829, advertised his intention to open a school at Amherst the following autumn, but there is no evidence to show that he secured any students. New York Peter Van Schaak, at Kinderhook, between 1786 and 1898, is said to have instructed "nearly a hundred young gentlemen." The New York Law Institute (Chapter XIX), founded in 1826, and formally organized in 1828 with Kent as president, was incorporated in 1830 "for literary purposes, the cultivation of legal science, the advancement of jurisprudence, the providing of a seminary of learning in the law, and the formation of a law library." The institution seems to have been designed...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 376 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 671g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236500539
  • 9781236500533