The Training of a Sovereign; An Abridged Selection from the Girlhood of Queen Victoria, Being Her Majesty's Diaries Between the Years 1832 and 1840,

The Training of a Sovereign; An Abridged Selection from the Girlhood of Queen Victoria, Being Her Majesty's Diaries Between the Years 1832 and 1840,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...the Princess Charlotte could not have married Uncle if she was of age, without her Father's permission. The Prince or Princess wishing to marry give notice to the Privy Council of their intention, and if it isn't objected to for a year, it may take place. Spoke of Charles I.'s intended marriage to the Infanta 01 Spain, which Lord M. said "was extremely distasteful to the nation," as they wished a Protestant Princess, and this marriage was broken off by the Duke of Buckingham, who quarrelled with Cardinal Olivarez, and they offended the Spanish Court amazingly; Buckingham then took Charles I. back by Paris, where he formed the match with Henrietta Maria, "which was not half so much" disliked as the other, though, Lord Melbourne said, the Country always suspected Charles when he asked for money to defend the Elector Palatine, that he would use it in France against the Protestants; they urged him, Lord M. said, to assist the Elector Palatine, and then would give him no money; "they always suspected him of having a leaning for the Roman Catholic Religion, and I supposed he had," continued Lord M. James I., Lord M. said, was far too proud to think of "marrying his son to a little German Princess," and there were 1 By the Royal Marriage Act, 1772, no descendant of George II. (other than the issue of Princesses married into foreign families) can marry without the Sovereign's consent, signified under the Great Seal and declared in Council. A marriage without that consent is void, and certain penalties attach to persons present or assisting at it. But any such descendant, if over twenty-five, may, after one year's notice to the Privy Council, marry without the Sovereign's consent, unless both Houses of Parliament...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123662114X
  • 9781236621146