Town, City and Nation

Town, City and Nation : England 1850-1914

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By the outbreak of the First World War England had become the world's first mass urban society. In just over sixty years the proportion of town-dwellers had risen from 50 to 80 per cent, and during this period many of the most crucial developments in English urban society had taken place. This book provides a uniquely comprehensive analysis of those developments - conurbations, suburbs, satellite towns, garden cities, and seaside resorts. The author assesses the importance of London, the provincial cities, and manufacturing centres; he also examines the continuing influence of the small country town and 'rural' England on political, economic, and cultural growth. In many respects, P. J. Waller's book is a general social history of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century England, seen from an urban perspective. It is both scholarly and immensely readable.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 356 pages
  • 137.2 x 213.4 x 20.3mm | 408.24g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Clarendon Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised ed.
  • 4 maps, 1 figure
  • 0192891634
  • 9780192891631
  • 2,000,648

Review quote

`Waller extracts much and his interpretations question prevalent stereotypes in English historiography and advance the definition of urban history itself ... a comprehensive view of its subject.' Urban History Review a mine of information, but also a pleasure to read. * Albion * `The material and ideas set out in this interesting book stimulate as well as inform.' History Todayshow more

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