The Tower; Its History, Armories, and Antiquities the Descriptions Accompanied with an Essay on English Armour from the Time of the Conqueror Till Its Final Disuse Now First Compiled from Official Documents in the Tower

The Tower; Its History, Armories, and Antiquities the Descriptions Accompanied with an Essay on English Armour from the Time of the Conqueror Till Its Final Disuse Now First Compiled from Official Documents in the Tower

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...fixed upon the shoulders, emblazoned with the arms of the knight, or a Saint George's cross. The pennon had superseded the gonfanon, being commonly charged with the crest, badge, or war-cry of the chief who bore it. The new weapons are the falchion, the Estoc (a small stabbing sword), the anelace, the coutel or military knife, and the scymetar. The Bassinet, a kind of helmet much like that on the figure under examination, was commonly worn: as were also the Chapel defer, and a cylindrical helmet with grated aventaille. In the reign of Edward III. the armour became very splendid; so much so, say the old chroniclers, that the knights, who would otherwise have been taken prisoners, were frequently killed for the sake of their spoils. Milan was the grand emporium, from whence the finest suits were supplied to the Chivalry of Europe. Salades, differing from the Bassinet in having a projection over the neck behind (the helmet on the figure of Henry VI. is a Salade), were generally worn.f The weapons of the knights of this period were chiefly lances, swords, maces, and battle-axes. Under Richard II. no great variation took place, either in the form of the body armour or its material. The helmet, however, underwent a curious change. The visor, instead of adapting itself to the contour of the bassinet, became of a peaked shape, projecting from the face like the beak of a bird. (See plate of Helmets, fig. 2.) Examples of this fashion are extremely rare: there is, however, a fine one in the Tower, J and Sir Samuel Meyrick has another. The shields were rounded at the bottom, with a niche or escallop made on one side of the top, called a bouche, serving as a rest for the lance. The manner of a tourney in this reign, we learn from Froissart. The front of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236669258
  • 9781236669254