Tourists Illustrated Guide to the Celebrated Summer and Winter Resorts of California; Adjacent to and Upon the Lines of the Central and Southern Pacific Railroads

Tourists Illustrated Guide to the Celebrated Summer and Winter Resorts of California; Adjacent to and Upon the Lines of the Central and Southern Pacific Railroads

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...him in tens of thousands, never to fire until he has set out his decoy and got into his blind. If he.shoots, the ducks become panic stricken and will desert the place, probably for the entire day. At his approach they fly off, but they will surely return in twos and threes, or singly, and afford him excellent sport all day. Ducks are not so much alarmed at the discharge of guns when they do not see from whom it proceeds; and many a hunter has spoiled a good day's sport by allowing himself to fire into a flock on first coming on the pond. If a strong breeze is blowing on the bay, the birds will return sooner to the pond for shelter and quiet, and offer easy shots to the concealed hunter; and a good shot with a brace of breech-loaders can enjoy himself until dark, and fill his boat with the plump beauties. Another method, which is much practiced later in the season, is sculling up and down the sloughs and dropping cautiously on the flocks of birds. For this form of sport, two are best in the boat, one to handle the sculls and the other to work a brace of breech-loaders beside him. This is the very acme of sport as regards duck shooting, and is more like upland work on quail and snipe. As the boat glides gently and noiselessly around the curves of the slough, now a brace of mallard, a flock of teal, or half a dozen pintail start up before the hunter, on whose quickness of aim, or what is technically termed snap-shooting, depends a large portion of his success. The great secret in this shooting is to be able to drop the birds on the water, and killing them clean or outright. If they fall in the tules they are almost invariably lost, and if a pinioned or wing-wounded bird falls in the water, it is next to impossible to retrieve it. This hunting comes...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236620941
  • 9781236620941