A Tour in America, in 1798, 1799, and 1800; Exhibiting Sketches of Soc. and Manners, and a Particular Account of the American System of Agriculture, with Its Recent Improvements Volume 2

A Tour in America, in 1798, 1799, and 1800; Exhibiting Sketches of Soc. and Manners, and a Particular Account of the American System of Agriculture, with Its Recent Improvements Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1805 edition. Excerpt: ...He used to sit up, and in the night, for fear any one should see him, to trim them for sale: had they been seen before dressing, the market would have been over. The method he adopted to make them saleable was a singular one: it was by oiling, and afterwards pressing them with a hot iron. He likewise told me several other stories similar to the preceding. It is a common saying in England, that "Cheating never thrives: " but, in America, with honest trading you cannot succeed. Another merchant, --a distant relation of mine, --the son of a very worthy and respectable farmer in England, who makes a considerable figure in life, tells me that he left England with fifteen guineas in his pocket: and when he arrived in America he got into a merchant's office, where they kept clerks, and carried on an extensive business. He soon discovered that they were not worth a guinea; but all they did was on credit. "Oh!" thought he, "if this be the case, I will be a merchant myself." To effect this, he wrote to his father in England, that, if he would send him two hundred pounds sterling, he could do very well. Accordingly, his father sent the desired sum. Instead of baying goods with the money, as he might be expected to have done, he bought two horses, kept a servant, rode about the country, and got into company, taking care to talk of a rich uncle he had in England who was his godr father, that his relations were wealthy, and that he had great expectations from them. By these means he formed connections, bought large quantities of goods on credit, took a proper place in a town, and fixed himself as a merchant; and, from every appearance, was doing very well. He said the Americans were the easiest to cheat of any men in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236893344
  • 9781236893345