The Total Solar Eclipse, 1900; Report of the Expeditions Organized by the British Astronomical Association to Observe the Total Solar Eclipse of 1900, May 28

The Total Solar Eclipse, 1900; Report of the Expeditions Organized by the British Astronomical Association to Observe the Total Solar Eclipse of 1900, May 28

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...transparent, and the instrument which I used was, without doubt, better than any hitherto employed for visual observation of an eclipse." Five members of the party stationed on the roof of the Hotel de la Bcgence, Algiers, took up this question of the detailed examination of the structure of the corona, in the telescope. Of these, Miss Lilian Martin-leake, observing with a 3-mch refractor, and a power of about 50, made an exceedingly careful drawing of the corona in the S.W. quadrant, paying especial attention to the region surrounding the prominence, situated about position angle 236. Miss Leake has given her observations in the form of a key-sketch to her drawing with notes upon the several structures shown, thus enabling the reader to reproduce and follow the details which she saw in the field of her telescope with great exactness. Mr. Crommelin, who was armed with a refractor of 3 inches aperture, selected the same general region as Miss Leake, and paid special attention to the neighbourhood of the prominence at 236, that is to say, the large double one shown in Miss Leake's picture. Besides his drawing, Mr. Crommelin supplies the following notes: --"As soon as the "Ten Seconds' signal was given I removed the cardboard screen, placed myself at the eyepiece of the telescope, and slightly changed the focus.sothat I was ready to commence observing when Mr. Maunder gave the signal 'Go.' I directed my attention to the largest prominence (position angle about 236) which was seen at once to be a magnificent double one, the left hand member being straight, while the right hand one was bent sharply to the left. The coronal light was of course pretty bright near the moon's limb, and for some seconds I could not make out any detailed...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123664042X
  • 9781236640420