A Topographical and Historical Description of the University and City of Oxford, with Views of Churches, Colleges, Halls, and Other Public Edifices, and the Most Remarkable Remains of Ancient Buildings, in the Vicinity of Oxford; To Which

A Topographical and Historical Description of the University and City of Oxford, with Views of Churches, Colleges, Halls, and Other Public Edifices, and the Most Remarkable Remains of Ancient Buildings, in the Vicinity of Oxford; To Which

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... a term used for those who cannot pass their examinations, and are therefore refused a testimonial, without which they cannot take a degree), must closely apply themselves to their studies; and this close application is incompatible with dissipation of any kind. This will account to strangers for the great order and decorum which prevail in Oxford, The exercise called determining is suspended. even in full term, when so many young men are assembled together. The only public amusements tolerated in the university are concerts at the music room, and occasional exhibitions, by permission of the vice-chancellor and the mayor. Plays are never permitted to be per formed during term. In the long vacation they have sometimes been allowed for the amusement of the inhabitants of the city, when a temporary theatre has been erected in a tennis court. Under-graduates must rise early, in order to attend chapel, and are not permitted to pass a night out of college: unless they are in by a certain hour, their names are given to the governor of the society; and a repetition of such irregularity would draw on them his displeasure. All gross offences against the statutes are followed by expulsion from the university; minor offences are punished by rustication, which is a banishment from the university for a certain length of time; and those of a more trivial nature, by fines, or by literary tasks, here termed impositions. Bachelors of arts and under-graduates of every description are compelled by the statutes to wear their academical dresses whenever they appear in the streets, or in the public walks of the university. The _ usual dinner hour of Oxford is half-past four; at some colleges it is later. Under-graduates are not allowed to dine at inns and...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236816900
  • 9781236816900