The Tone System in Public Speaking and Reading; A Discussion of the Sources of Effectiveness in Oral Expression and in the Teaching of Oral Expression

The Tone System in Public Speaking and Reading; A Discussion of the Sources of Effectiveness in Oral Expression and in the Teaching of Oral Expression

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ... How they are to be applied to the actual interpretation of literature has to a great extent been shown in preceding chapters and will further be shown in those to come. It is of their application to the development of responsive power that I wish here to speak. By responsive power is meant the ability to orally portray emotion. The question will at once be asked, is it necessary in order to orally portray emotion that we should be really under emotion, feeling? And, with certain exceptions, this must be conceded. A speaker can only attain the highest effect, the greatest results, by being under the feeling, emotion, he has to portray. But by "feeling" is not here meant a state of emotion in which the person is helplessly and ungovernably swayed by it, but one in which the judgment keeps aloof, overseeing all, directing all. To make the meaning clear. A man has been insulted by a woman; his blood boils; passion rises and he strikes her. This state is "feeling," "emotion" as sometimes understood, and might be named "ungoverned passion," a state of feeling in which the judgment and self control are engulfed and play no part. This "feeling" every speaker should shun. The feeling here meant is not this kind, but, as I first stated, one in which the judgment keeps aloof, directing all. Thus, let us suppose an insult similar to our first illustration again occurs. As before the man's passion arises, but this time on the very fall of his hand he checks himself. Surely no one will assert, that because here the man does not strike the woman he is under no genuine feeling, is not in earnest. By our very supposition he is under all the emotion of the first case cited. The difference is that this emotion, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236637631
  • 9781236637635