The Tin Deposits of the York Region, Alaska Volume 8, No. 229

The Tin Deposits of the York Region, Alaska Volume 8, No. 229

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ... mouth to within 1 mile of its head. The pay streak appears to be confined to the present stream-bed and flood-plain deposits. In the present creek bed the ore is found from the surface to the bottom of the gravels. Outside the creek bed, in the flood plain, there is a covering of moss and muck above the pay gravel. No cassiterite is known to have been found on the hillsides surrounding Buck Creek or on the plateau surface in which Buck Creek Valle-is incised, though such an occurrence is to be expected. The known pay streak varies in width from 10 to 150 feet, and in thickness from a few inches to 5 feet. Estimates of the amount of tin ore in the gravels vary from 8 to 27 pounds per cubic yard, but very few comprehensive tests have been made. At the time of Mr. Hess's visit to Buck Creek, near the end of July, sluicing for tin ore was in progress at only one place. The creek valley still contained great drifts of snow, and mining operations generally were retarded by the lateness of the season. Stream tin is harder to separate from the gravel than is gold on account of its lower specific gravity, but the methods employed in washing it out were modifications of somewhat primitive processes of gold placer mining. Ten men were shoveling into the one "string" Fig. 4.--Sluice boxes used in washing placer tin in York region. of sluice boxes and a clean up was made four times a day, so that the work was frequently interrupted. The sluice boxes used were 16 feet long, 24 inches wide at the upper end and 22 inches wide at the lower end, and 7 boxes were used in a "string," making a total length of 150 feet. A "dove box" 8 feet long, i feet wide at the upper end and 22 inches wide at the lower end, with riffles, was Bull....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236525906
  • 9781236525901