Thrilling Narrative of the Grinnell Exploring Expedition to the Arctic Ocean in the Years 1853, 1854 and 1855; In Search of Sir John Franklin, Under the Command of D. E. K. Kane

Thrilling Narrative of the Grinnell Exploring Expedition to the Arctic Ocean in the Years 1853, 1854 and 1855; In Search of Sir John Franklin, Under the Command of D. E. K. Kane

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ... other object alarms her maternal sensibilities, she'takes up her interesting offspring, one at a time, and pitches them into the sea; after which she herself plunges in, seizes her babes in her affectionate arms, and disappears under the ice, or water. The female of this species, as well as of many others, is more ferocious than the male, especially when she conceives it necessary to act in defense of her young. On such occasions, she is sometimes provoked to make an attack on the fishermen who approach her place of resort; she then tosses her cubs from her, and with all her force rushes against the side of the boat, as if with the design of crushing it by the collision. In combat, this animal is what some people would term " an ugly customer." It is impossible to kill one unless you can succeed in striking it on the forehead. At all other points they are nearly invulnerable. Walruses are more numerous on the western coast of Spitzbergen than in Baffin's Bay, Behring's Straits, or any other part of the Arctic seas with which I am acquainted. In fine weather, they resort in large numbers to large pieces of ice floating about the edges of the great marine glaciers. Hundreds of them are often seen in a herd, and many different herds may be in view at the same time. They appear to enjoy themselves very much, tumbling about on the ice and making the air resound with their bellowing, which much resembles that of bulls. When they fatigue themselves with these diversions, they betake themselves to repose; but these wary animals, before they resign themselves to slumber, always take the precaution of appointing a sentinel to arouse them on the approach of any danger. So universal is the observance of this precaution, amongst the species, that no sleeping...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236676483
  • 9781236676481