The Three Powers of Government; The Origin of the United States and the Status of the Southern States, on the Suppression of the Rebellion. the Three Dangers of the Republic. Lectures Delivered in the Law School of Harvard College, and in

The Three Powers of Government; The Origin of the United States and the Status of the Southern States, on the Suppression of the Rebellion. the Three Dangers of the Republic. Lectures Delivered in the Law School of Harvard College, and in

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...their connection as colonies with the mother country. As the contest is prolonged, the probability of obtaining redress becomes less, the dangers of subjugation become more apparent, and the idea of independence is entertained. The several popular organizations discuss it, act upon it, and assent that it shall be declared. But it is the independence of the several colonies, which are to become free and independent States. The nature and character of what was proposed to be done was well expressed by the action of the Connecticut Assembly, instructing its delegates to propose to Congress " to declare the United American Colonies free and independent States," and that they move and promote a plan of union and confederation of the colonies for the security and just preservation of their just rights and liberties, and for mutual defence and security, saving that the administration of government and the power of forming governments for, and the regulation of the internal police of each colony ought to be left and remain to the respective colonial legislatures, and also that such plan of confederation be laid before such respective legislatures for their previous consideration and assent." The Declaration of Independence is made by the delegates representing their respective constituents in accordance with the authority thus conferred, and it is, not that the whole people are an independent nation, nor with any assertion of a common power except as it is derived from their separate populations, but with a recital of grievances common to and affecting all, and with the distinct and emphatic declaration that these colonies " are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States." The assertion of independent sovereignty in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236644549
  • 9781236644541